Posts Tagged 'Inks'

In the News: Cities, Notebook Love, and Presidential Proclamations

Technology (and the like)

» Scary fact: did you know the cell phone industry actually admits the health risks of cell phone radiation? Apparently this is not the stuff of conspiracy theorists anymore: Apple recommends holding your iPhone no closer than 5/8″ to your body, and BlackBerry recommends holding your phone a full inch away. Read more in Tom Philpott’s article: Is my smartphone making me dumb?

» Some “Tough Love” advice for having a better life: Americans need to stop multitasking while eating alone.

» The event already passed, but I really like the message behind Jimmy Kimmel’s National Unfriend Day. The idea is to restore meaning to the word ‘friend’ by cutting down on facebook friends who… well, aren’t actually your friends.

» The event already passed, but I really like Jimmy Kimmel’s “National Unfriend Day.” The idea is to cut down on facebook “friends” who… aren’t actually your friends. Heck, you can do this anytime and restore some meaning to the word ‘friend’.

» Read a good paperback recently? I like this down-to-earth ‘best books’ list from The Guardian (via The EarlyWord)

Pen | Paper | Ink | DIY

» Etsy, how I love thee. Check out their recommendations for keeping analog time in 2011 – nothing digital about it.

» Jonathan Safran Foer, I love you and your unmakeable book more than Etsy.

» I hate to bash NaNoWriMo so soon after writing a positive post about it, but I’m just so in agreement with this Salon.com article that I had to share.

» DIY Love: Social activists have long protested the consumerism of Black Friday by celebrating Buy Nothing Day instead, but I’m even MORE supportive of this new (more positive) approach: Make Something Day.

» Ooh, lovely burgundies, wines, and maroons:  Ink Mixing with J. Herbin’s Anniversary Ink (via Writer’s Bloc)

» Hooray, two of my favorite things: Notebooks and gardening!

» I don’t know if I’ve mentioned it before, but Rhodia/Clairefontaine/Exaclair have some of the best customer service and genuine grassroots marketing. Ever.

Rurality | Urbanism

» Poor urbanites: apparently New Yorkers are the most stressed Americans since the economy collapsed – but not because they’re doing worse than other parts of the country (they’re not). It’s because the city doesn’t offer effective ways to deal with stress. (via Daily News)

» But! This whole city-stress phenomenon may not be unique to New York. A recent study showed that the overstimulated atmosphere cities had a negative impact on attention span, memory, and on mood in general. (via CNN)

» Somehow I find the idea of “Proclamations” adorably antiquated, but this one I can get behind: Obama declared November 19-25th “Farm-City Week”

» Whoa whoa whoa – Kentucky canceled a coal plant?

Miscellaneous Cultural Fun!

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Mixing Up Summer Inks

Impending college loans have put me in a super-frugal state of mind. I haven’t bought any new inks in a while– but I have had some fun this summer mixing up remnants of the inks that I had.

The result? A veritable rainbow. Makes for very exciting writing.

Summer Inks on a Rhodia Dotpad

Survey, from top to Bottom

I. Aurora Black is a staple in my ink lineup. It’s not waterproof, which is unfortunate, but it’s just so. smooth. On the sexy end of the smooth spectrum, really.

II. I mixed this green– a combination of J. Herbin Vert Olive and Levenger Gemstone Green –for the first time in May, when I was writing a paper on Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It’s a wonderful dark olive green, professional and not too yellow.

III. This was a spastic mixing experiment, but I’m really pleased with the green-gray result, which is now in my Pelikan M400. I started with an anonymous dark blue that kind of resembled PR’s Black Magic Blue, and then added a lot of J. Herbin Vert Olive and J. Herbin Poussiere de Lune.

IV. I love J. Herbin’s Diabolo Menthe, but it’s totally impractical for writing. I added a few drops of PR’s Electric DC Blue, which darkened it to a lovely aqua blue and also made it flow better.

V. I’ve used this mix for a while to create the perfect mid-tone blue; it’s a combination of J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche and PR Electric DC Blue.

VI. I think I officially prefer to mix my own Burgundy’s, rather than buying them. I literally combined a ton of leftover samples of various blues and reds –and came up with this wonderful purply-wine color.

VII. This bright red started with Noodler’s Golden Brown, which I combined with a sample of Noodler’s Dragon’s Napalm, to which I added J. Herbin Rouge Carobier and J. Herbin Rouge Opera.

VIII. Diamine’s Poppy Red. Enough said.

IX. I wanted a good summer peach color, so I started with J. Herbin Rouille d’Ancre, and added some Diamine Poppy Red and J. Herbin Orange Indien.

A Date with J. Herbin

Inky Gifts Are My Favorite Gifts

I mentioned a while ago that I received some beautiful new inks and nibs from a generous stranger on Fountain Pen Network. It’s funny how, even in an age of consumerism, humans still find ways to create gift communities. It’s almost as though it’s in our nature to share; we instinctually know that a gift creates a social bond where there was none.

On a related note, I highly highly recommend reading Lewis Hyde’s The Gift. He’s one of those rare writers that fully acknowledges that he is writing through a privileged [white, male] lens, and yet approaches a topic confidently, using that lens as a tool. I’m also lucky enough to be taking a class with him this semester, and have constructed some elaborate plans to pick his brain…

But okay, onward to the meat and potatoes of this entry, which is the ink comparisons.

A couple of notes: I find that scans never turn out color-accurate, so I tend to stick with photographs. I use two different dip nib to test inks: an italic that writes more like a wet fountain pen, and a round speedball that writes a bit drier. This allows you to see the way the ink might look in different pens. And remember to click any image or icon for a full-size view!

Also, there are more comparisons coming later (sheesh, can’t blow my load all in one entry…)

Oranges and Browns

Oranges Browns 3Oranges Browns (bottom)

Private Reserve Fiesta Red …is a name that implies a totally different color than you see here. Regardless, this is a subdued burgundy. At some point I’ll do a comparison with PR Black Cherry and some others. This ink is saturated, and has some shading.

Noodler’s Dragon’s Napalm makes me want to get out the glow sticks and neon bracelets. Unlike Noodler’s highlighter inks, however, Dragon’s Napalm is still totally legible for writing, which is the reason why I love it. I just need to find an excuse to use it…

Noodler’s Cayenne has superb shading. I remember having to choose between this and Noodler’s Habanero when I ordered some inks a while ago: Cayenne is like a darker Habanero, but definitely not any less intense. I’m dying to try it out with some calligraphy…

Private Reserve Orange Crush is yet another ink that doesn’t seem to match its name. Still, this is a super sexy color, like burnt orange with a bit of shading. I’d feel comfortable using it for casual everyday writing.

Noodler’s FPN Galileo Manuscript Brown falls on the limits of the “brown” category; it’s a very light red-brown. In fact, out of all the inks I received, I’d compare it most to fiesta red (at the top of the page). Fiesta Red is a bit more purple, though, while Galileo Manuscript Brown leans towards auburn.

Noodler’s Swishmix Grizzly, for whatever reason, grosses me out. I have to admit that the name is eerily accurate; this ink is almost precisely the color of grizzly bears (look, I watched Grizzly Man one too many times, okay?). I could make other comparisons, though: ashy mustard? Desert sand at night? I can’t tell precisely why, but it feels a little washed out as an ink– even though it actually has pretty decent shading.

Noodler’s Beaver sort of bored me, unfortunately. I’d say that it falls into the red-brown family, though it doesn’t play up the red (like, for example, Waterman Havana Brown). I know a lot of professionals like to use this color. So, I guess I’ll never be working a desk job… [also, I realize that I spelled “burgundy” incorrectly in the writing sample]

Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan may be the only true brown ink that I own right now. I wouldn’t say that it’s boring, but it feels like a brown crayon or something. Compared to Beaver and Brown (ha), though, I’d say it has a bit of gold in it.

Noodler’s Brown is, first of all, a boring name. Like Noodler’s Beaver, it’s redder than Kiowa Pecan.

[P.S. Don’t judge the dry time of those last two based on the smudge; I turned the page too early and the samples at the top had already had time to dry…]

more blues

Blues midBlues bottom

Caran D’Ache Blue Night isn’t blue. More like a cool greeny gray. It also isn’t likely to show up as dark as it does in the italic sample; it’s very washed out.

Mont Blanc Blue Black is definitely a professional ink (I suppose anyone buying MB’s has got to be a professional). It’s a warmer gray that CD Blue Night, but neither of them are what I imagine when I think of “blue black.” Not very saturated, but perhaps I’ll pair this neutral with a brighter color for some art.

Lamy Blue Black is.. slightly closer to the “blue black” category than Caran D’Ache or Mont Blanc. It’s a medium denim color, fairly saturated. I’ve seen some snazzy shading in other reviews, though there’s not much here.

Waterman Blue Black **NOTE** I received two samples labeled “Waterman Blue Black” –and they’re totally different colors. So, you may want to ignore this swatch and look elsewhere for reviews. You can see on the right side of the page that I swatched both vials and they’re totally different. From other reviews it looks like the lighter swatch is the correct one, so just ignore this.

Private Reserve Black Magic Blue is a very saturated royal blue. I’ll compare this side-by-side with Electric DC Blue sometime, but from my first impressions it seems to be a tad more purple.

Sheaffer Blue makes me want to drink tea out of fine china. It’s what we call “colonial blue” down in colonial Virginia.

Noodler’s Swishmix Tahitian Pearl is a very saturated, free flowing ink. Not for use in wet writers, I say! This was the only sample that bled through the paper, but that’s with a dip nib, so I’ll follow up on that statement.

Noodler’s Squeteague, even though I know that it’s a fish, always seems to appear as a rubber ducky in my head. In any case, it’s actually fairly similar to Tahitian Pearl, though a bit more teal and less gray. It’s also not as wet and has a bit more shading.

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

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"Show Must Go On" by Alselon

Ohh, I realized the color! J. Herbin’s Rouge Opera is the color of those plush velvet seats in old theaters. Or, a less intense version of various scenes in Moulin Rouge. So, that makes sense.

So, I received this from the ever-generous Karen Doherty through the Quo Vadis blog’s Bastille Day Giveaway. I tried this ink in three different pens: a Lamy Safari with a F nib, a Lamy Al-Star with a 1.1 italic nib, and a Pilot Prera with a F nib, which is the equivalent of an XF nib in the U.S. I read a review of this ink that said it looked better in a fine nib, so I figured I’d cover all the areas.

This ink is not very saturated, which is a general trend with J. Herbin inks. As a result, I tend to like their colors that are intentionally light, like Diabolo Menthe, and disappointed by their deeper colors… like this one. But it does have a bit of nice shading in the italic and the F nibs. In the Pilot XF nib, the ink was much too washed out and became a sort of dusty floral color.

RougeOperaThis photo makes it look a bit more saturated than it is in real life– it’s not nearly so neon.

Some inks look sort of cool when they’re washed out, but in this case it just looks too pink. And, um, I don’t dig pink ink. I’ll bet that it would look a bit better on cream or ivory paper, instead of the bright white. Perhaps using a wider italic nib than the 1.1 would also serve this ink well. Biffybeans reviewed this ink, and it looks much more purple than mine, especially on the ivory paper.

RougeOpera3RougeOpera2

This ink also had a dry start when I first tried it in with the italic nib. Which might have been a fluke, because other J. Herbin inks have worked just fine in that pen. I think I should have requested Rouge Caroubier, which is supposedly a bit more of an orange-red instead of a pink-red. Ah, well!


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